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" Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence (I conjure you to believe me, fellow citizens) the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake, since history and experience prove that foreign influence is one of the most baneful foes of republican... "
Speeches and Forensic Arguments - Page 21
by Daniel Webster - 1835
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The Orations on Bunker Hill Monument : the Character of Washington and the ...

Daniel Webster - 1894 - 101 pages
...towards such connection of foreign interests with our own affairs. With a tone of earnestness nowhere else found, even in his last affectionate farewell advice to his countrymen, he says, " Against the insid—JZ- 3 •* <-t<.>*;v n' VA ^ . w CHARACTER OF WASHINGTON. 81 ious wiles of foreign influence...
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The American Historical Review, Volume 5

John Franklin Jameson, Henry Eldridge Bourne, Robert Livingston Schuyler - 1900
...farewell address to his fellow-citizens. ' Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence (says he) I conjure you to believe me fellow-citizens, the jealousy of a free people ought constantly to be awake.' But from this part of the report we were compelled to dissent for another...
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The American Magazine of Civics, Volume 7

Andrew J. Palm, Henry Randall Waite - 1895
...come here from the favored country. With an emphasis nowhere else exhibited in the address, Washington says, "against the insidious wiles of foreign influence (I conjure you to believe me, fellow citizens) the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake ; since history and experience...
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Select American Classics: Being Selections from Irving's Sketch Book and ...

1896
...towards such connection of foreign interests with our own affairs. With a tone of earnestness nowhere else found, even in his last affectionate farewell...of foreign influence (I conjure you to believe me, fellow citizens), the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake, since history and experience...
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Hamilton, Lincoln & Other Addresses

Melancthon Woolsey Stryker - 1896 - 191 pages
...Washington still be heard: "Resist with care the spirit of innovation, however specious the pretexts. . . . Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence (I...jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake." [Tremendous cheering.] Yes, great leader, we do believe; we will remember; God helping us, we will...
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Daniel Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration: Together with Other Addresses ...

Daniel Webster - 1896 - 137 pages
...towards such connection of foreign interests with our own affairs. With a tone of earnestness nowhere else found, even in his last affectionate farewell advice to his countrymen, he savs, " Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence, (I conjure you to believe me, fellow-citizens,)...
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A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents, 1789-1897, Volume 1

United States. President, James Daniel Richardson - 1896
...small or weak toward a great and powerful nation dooms the former to be the satellite of the latter. Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence ( I conjure you to believe me, fellow-citi/eiis ) the jealousy of a free people ought to be constant/Y awake, since history and experience...
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Works, Volume 40

Washington Irving - 1857
...small or weak, towards a great and powerful nation, dooms the former to be the satellite of the latter. Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence [I...jealousy of a free people ought to be [constantly]? awike, since history and experience prove that foreign * 1stly t adly t my friends \ incessantly influence...
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The Arena, Volume 19

1898
...to mould our institutions to conform to European ideals? Washington, in his farewell address, said: "Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence (I conjure you to believe me, fellow citizens) the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake: since history and experience...
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A Library of Universal Literature: In 4 Parts, Comprising Science ..., Volume 6

1900
...toward such connection of foreign interests with our own affairs. With a tone of earnestness nowhere else found, even in his last affectionate farewell...of foreign influence (I conjure you to believe me, fellow citizens), the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake; since history and experience...
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