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" Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence (I conjure you to believe me, fellow citizens) the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake, since history and experience prove that foreign influence is one of the most baneful foes of republican... "
Speeches and Forensic Arguments - Page 21
by Daniel Webster - 1835
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Early Warning System in Sinai: Hearings ..., 94-1, October 6, 7, 1975

United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Foreign Relations - 1975 - 264 pages
...laudable zeal for public good, the base or foolish compliances of ambition, corruption, or infatuation. Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence (I conjure you to believe me fellow citizens) the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake : since history and experience...
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The Best of Times: The Worst of Times

Gyeorgos C. Hatonn - 1993
...Concerned that the American people might fall under the sway of corrupt powers, Washington stated: "Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence (I conjure you to believe me fellow citizens), the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake; since history and experience...
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Diplomat's Dictionary

Charles W. Freeman, Jr. - 1994 - 603 pages
...small or weak towards a great and powerful nation dooms the former to be the satellite of the latter. "Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence (I conjure you to believe me, fellow citizens), the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake, since history and experience...
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New World Strategy: A Military Policy for America's Future

Harry G. Summers, Jr., Harry G. Summers - 1995 - 270 pages
...participation in the quarrels and wars of the latter without adequate inducement or justification. "Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence (I conjure you to believe me, fellow-citizens)," Washington concluded, "the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake." Those admonitions...
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The Long Affair: Thomas Jefferson and the French Revolution, 1785-1800

Conor Cruise O'Brien - 1998 - 367 pages
...Farewell Address. As regards party politics and international affairs the key words of the Address are: "Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence (I conjure you to believe me, fellow citizens), the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake. . . . Excessive partiality...
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USA und Mittelamerika: die Aussenpolitik von William J. Bryan, 1913-1915

Ralph Dietl - 1996 - 496 pages
...Warnung George Washingtons an seine Mitbürger vom 17.6.1796 (Washington's Farewell Address) bestimmt: "against the insidious wiles of foreign influence I conjure you to believe me, fellow citizens the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake, since history and experience...
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A Sacred Union of Citizens: George Washington's Farewell Address and the ...

Matthew Spalding, Patrick J. Garrity - 1996 - 216 pages
...weak, towards a great and powerful Nation, dooms the former to be the satellite of the latter. 34. Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence, (I conjure you to believe me, fellow citizens) the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake; since history and experience...
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From Many, One: Readings in American Political and Social Thought

Richard C. Sinopoli - 1996 - 448 pages
...quarrels and Wars of the latter, without adequate inducement or justification. . . . [Text omitted] Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence, (I conjure you to believe me fellow citizens) the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake; since history and experience...
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On Faith and Free Government

Daniel C. Palm - 1997 - 201 pages
...small or weak, towards a great and powerful Nation, dooms the former to be the satellite of the latter. Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence (I conjure you to believe me, fellow citizens) the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake, since history and experience...
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Promised Land, Crusader State: The American Encounter with the World Since 1776

Walter A. McDougall - 1997 - 286 pages
...indulges toward another an habitual hatred or an habitual fondness is in some degree a slave. . . . Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence (I conjure you to believe me, fellow- citizens) the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly awake, since history and experience...
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