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" though not verbally Latin, yet it is the outcome of the Latin grammatical doctrine that the verb to be takes the same case after it as before it. This is a plain instance of the invasion of idiom by grammar. "
State Normal Monthly - Page 26
by Kansas State Teachers College of Emporia - 1897
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An introduction to English grammar

Adam Speers - 1879 - 144 pages
...apposition with a Noun; eg, " What accounts for John's rapid progress is the FACT that he is diligent." 258. The Verb 'To Be' takes the same case after it as before it; eg, " I AM he " (I and he both Nominative). " He is a good man" (he and man both Nominative). " I proved...
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Moffatt's pupil teachers' course (ed. by T. Page). Candidates, 2nd (-4th) year

Moffatt and Paige - 1879
...Case.") sessor and the second the thing possessed, the first is in possessive case. (See " Case.") 4. The verb " to be " takes the same case after it as before it: " The ship was a wooden -vessel." Here the noun " ship" coming before the verb " was " (past tense...
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How to teach grammar

Thomas J. Livesey - 1880
...government:— 1. "Transitive verbs and prepositions govern nouns and pronouns in the objective case." 2. " The verb 'to be' takes the same case after it as before it." And such exercises as the following would stamp the rules indelibly on the memory. Correct the Following....
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Blackie's comprehensive school series, Issue 7

Blackie and son, ltd - 1880
...Nouns or pronouns in apposition are in the same gender, number, and case (Lesson xvii. par 3). (e) The verb "to be" takes the same case after it as before it (Lesson xxi. par. 4). Note.—The above rules should henceforth be incorporated in the Parsing Exercises...
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An introduction to English grammar

Adam Speers - 1880 - 144 pages
...apposition with a Noun; eg, " What accounts for John's rapid progress is the FACT that he is diligent." 258. The Verb 'To Be' takes the same case after it as before it; eg, " I AM he" (I and he both Nominative). " He is a good man " (fie and man both Nominative). " I...
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The English language: its grammar and history. With examination papers

Henry Lewis (M.A.) - 1881
...instance. Jt would be preferable to acknowledge a Vocative Case. In construction the syntactical rule is, that the verb to be takes the same case after it as before it. I am he. Jt is I. He is not the man I intended. The POSSESSIVE CASE is that form of the substantive...
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How to teach grammar

Thomas J. Livesey - 1881 - 147 pages
...government:— 1. " Transitive verbs and prepositions govern nouns and pronouns in the objective case." 2. " The verb 'to be' takes the same case after it as before it." And such exercises as the following would stamp the rules indelibly on the memory. Correct the Following....
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Moffatt's pupil teachers' course (ed. by T. Page). Candidates, 2nd ..., Volume 1

Moffatt and Paige - 1883
...Case.") sessor and the second the thing possessed, the first is in the possessive case. (See " Case.") 4. The verb " to be " takes the same case after it as before it: " The ship was a wooden vessel." Here the noun " ship" coming before the verb " was " (past tense of...
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Speech and manners for home and school

Elizabeth Stansbury Kirkland - 1883
...must you say, ' I thought it was her.' What is that rule in your grammar about the verb ' To be'?" " The verb ' To be ' takes the same case after it as before it." " Then, after ' was,' or any other part of the verb, you mustn't put' her' or ' him' or ' them' or...
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The beginner's Latin exercise book

Charles Joseph S. Dawe - 1883 - 106 pages
...TV. SECOND DECLENSION— (ran). EULE 3. — The Possessor is put in the Genitive Case. BOLE 4. — The Verb " To Be " takes the same Case after it as before. Obs. — When no Nominative occurs in a Latin sentence, a Pronoun is supplied ; thus, amat, (be) forę....
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