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" For, to say nothing of half the birds, and some quadrupeds which are almost entirely supported by them, worms seem to be the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and... "
Animal biography, or, Popular zoology - Page 273
by William Bingley - 1829
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Natural History of Selborne & Observations on Nature, Volume 2

Gilbert White - 1895
...lamely without them ; by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants ; by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it ; and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm-casts, which, being...
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The Universal Anthology: A Collection of the Best Literature, Ancient ...

Richard Garnett, Leon Vallée, Alois Brandl - 1899
...lamely without them ; by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants ; by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it ; and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm-casts, which, being...
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The Great World's Farm: Some Account of Nature's Crops and how They are Grown

Selina Gaye - 1900 - 365 pages
...are its services in boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it, and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth, which is a fine manure for grain...
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Science-gossip, Volumes 7-8

1900
...lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants ; by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it ; and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm-casts, which, being...
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The Great World's Farm

Selina Gaye - 1902 - 283 pages
...services in boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibers of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it, and most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth, which is a fine manure for grain...
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The Leisure Hour, Volume 31

William Haig Miller, James Macaulay, William Stevens - 1882
...lamely withoftt them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants ; by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it; and most of all by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth, called wormcasts, which, being...
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The Natural History of Selborne

Gilbert White - 1906 - 255 pages
...Selborne 185 them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it; and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm-casts, which, being...
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Handbook of Commercial Geography

George Goudie Chisholm - 1908 - 639 pages
...of vegetation ... by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of leaves into it ; and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth, called worm-casts,...
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Darwinism and Human Life: The South African Lectures for 1909

John Arthur Thomson - 1910 - 245 pages
...lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants ; by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it ; and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm-casts, which, being...
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Homiletic Review, Volume 67

1914
...them; by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibers of plants; by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it ; and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm-casts, which, being...
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