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SELECTIONS IN POETRY.

DIALOGUES.

59, Sir Christopher and Quiz. .....HALL.......... 90
79. Hamlet and Horatio............ Shakspeare .....128
99. Rolla and the Sentinel.......... Kotzebue ........155
113. Butler, Vellum, and Sir George. . Addison..... . 176
120. Sir George, Butler, and Servants. Ibid...........187
128. Hardcastle and Servants ........ Goldsmith .....199
142. The Tent Scene between Brutus

and Cassius................. Shakspeare. ... .225
160. Vellum and Butler........ ..... Addison .......251
163. Sir Anthony and Absolute....... Sheridan.......256
Page.
165. Williams, Splash, and Etymology.WATTERSTON...261
168. Orlando, Oliver, &c............ Shakspeare. ... .267
169. Aufidius and Coriolanus......... Ibid. ..........270
178. Sir Philip Blandford and Ashfield. . Morton ........ 285

INDEX OF AUTHORS.

69

174

199

36

The names of American authors are in Italic.
Addison, 31, 176, 187, 251 ) Emmet,

88

Ames, 103, 137, 140, 142 Erskine, 27, 52, 53

Anonymous, 26, 62, 247

Everett, 46, 70, 71, 223

Bayard, 237, 238, 239, 240 | Fitch,

Beecher,

63, 143

Foote,

Brooks,
i 287 Foster,

222
Brougham,
107 | Gaston,

263
Bryant,

104 Goldsmith,

Burke, 22, 24, 25, 99, 130,

Granby,

169, 184, 185, 186, Grattan,

290
201, 207
Hall, E.

90

Halleck,

126

Byron 158, 175, 194, 229, Hamilton,

15, 16
253, 259,

Harper,

32, 35

Campbell, 44, 154

Chalmers,

80 Hayne, 59, 111, 115
Channing, 30, 164 Hemans,

72
Chatham, 203, 204 Henry,

19, 20

Clay,

280, 282 Hopkinson, 196, 197

Cowper,

50 Indian Chief, 245

Croly,

249, 250 Johnson,

Cumberland,

86 Kotzebue

155

Curran, 47, 49, 76, 77,98, || Livingston,

195

Logan,

245

Davis,

210 | Mason, J. M., 244
Dexter,
172 || M.Duffie,

208
Dwight, S. E., 152 || Montgomery, J., 64, 68,198

Haven,

85

193

Pitt,

261

276

Montgomery, R.. 96 | Smith, J.,

101

Morris, G., 43, 265 Sprague, C., 55, 56, 163
Morton,

285 Sprague, P., 179, 181, 214

Peel,

106 Storrs, 74, 217, 220

Percival, 82, 183, 278 Story, 81, 159, 161, 165,

Pierpont, .18, 21, 145 167

168 || Taylor,

288

Quincy,

235, 272 || Watterston,
Randolph, E., 13 Webster, 38, 39, 40, 41, 60,
Randolph, J.,

108, 113, 118, 119,
Red Jacket,

246

122, 124, 133, 134,
Sergeant,

284 135, 233, 242, 273,

Shakspeare, 34, 191, 206,

275, 293, 294, 295,

58, 75, 131, 136,

297
171, 205, 128, 225, | Wilberforce, 65, 67
243, 255, 267, 270 Wirt,

153, 231
Sheridan, 84, 146, 147, 149, || Wolfe,
150, 256

RECAPITULATION.
NUMBER OF AUTHORS.

Prose.

American.............

44

English. ................ 16

37

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ERRATA.
The following are the principal errors in this (third) edition :
Page 103, line 15 from bottom, for malt read mast.

" 12 " " damages read danger.

“ 104, 1st line in pote, for explots read exploits.

" 110, line 18 from bottom, for there read then.

* 269, lst line in note, for asservation read asseveration.

No. 75 should be 74, and No. 77 should be 76. There are, therefore, two extracts less than
the highest number would indicate.

THE

NATIONAL ORATOR.

1.--THE IMPORTANCE OF THE UNION OF THE STATES. *

Extract from Edmund Randolph's Speech, on the expediency of adopt.

ing the Federal Constitution, delivered in the Convention of Virginia, June 6th, 1788.

AFTER having 'heretofore attempted, Mr. Chairman, to ow, by a course of argument, the excellency of the proised constitution ; how its adoption is intimately connect. 1 with the continuance of the union ; and how important ill be the vote of our own state to this end ; I will now include with a few observations, which come from my sart. I have labored for the continuance of the union e rock of our salvation. I believe that, as sure as there a God in heaven, our safety, our political happiness and

* After the close of the revolutionary war, when there was no foreign le to unite the states together, by one grand, all-absorbing interest, it as perceived and deeply felt, by the wisest and best men throughout e land, that the old articles of confederation were weak and ineffi. ent; unable either to preserve harmony within, or even to unite us ain in case of another attack from without. It was proposed, there. re, that each state should send delegates to Philadelphia, either to vise the old articles of confederation, or to plan and mature a new nstitution. Accordingly, in May, 1787, the delegates, chosen by their spective states, met in convention at Philadelphia, and the result of ir deliberations was our present constitution. After its adoption by

convention, it was sent to the different states for ratification, and s not to be valid unless nine states should adopt it. In some of the

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